SYNDICATION

Welcome to the Home of Radio Syndication

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can anybody do a syndicated radio show?
A: Yes, with just a few qualifications. Experience has shown us that successful hosts have an interesting point of view to share with listeners. If you’re an expert at something, that’s a plus. It’s also good to have a sense of humor and a passion about what you do. Previous broadcasting experience helps, but it’s less important than these qualifications.

Q: There’s already a syndicated show like the one I want to do. Am I out of luck?
A: Absolutely not! Think of McDonald’s, and then think of Burger King, Wendy’s, and all the other thriving restaurant competitors. In radio syndication, there is also plenty of room for competition since 11,000 stations all need programming. Plus, the Internet has opened up a fantastic new audience for syndicators via streaming audio. There’’s always fresh opportunity, even if your show is simply an improvement on an existing idea.

Q: Does it cost a lot to get into syndication?
A: It depends on the kind of show you want to do. You can launch a weekly vignette or feature (short-form) for relatively little money, and still reach a national audience. A daily short feature will cost a little more. Still higher in cost is a weekly talk or music show (long-form), such as one to four hours on the weekend. And a daily long show will cost even more to launch. Of course, your potential income is much higher with a longer show. There are other options. For example, Internet radio can be extremely affordable to do, but for the foreseeable future you won’t reach the listeners or achieve anywhere near the income compared with broadcast radio.

Q: How much can I earn by doing a syndicated show? What’s the potential income?
A: Again, there are significant variables here. There are different ways to structure a show for income, and we recommend creating a number of income streams from your show. But it is not uncommon to gross a six-figure annual income with a successful daily short feature or a successful weekend show. Seven-figure annual grosses are attainable with a successful daily syndicated long-form show. A syndication superstar such as Rush may earn eight figures. You will obviously earn considerably less in the initial growth stages of your show.

Q: I’m already doing a radio show. How can I make the jump to syndication?
A: You are ahead of the game. Read Six Steps to Successful Syndication on our web site because that’s the proven formula, and you’ve already accomplished one of the six steps. If you have a strong feeling that your show would work in syndication, chances are you’re right. Follow that feeling!

Q: How do I get radio stations to pick up my show?
A: This happens when you do everything right: create a quality show, consistently remind stations your show exists, and follow up consistently with stations that express an interest. There are also companies you can hire, such as ours, that can help you sign up affiliates.

Q: Once I have a syndicated show, how do I sell the commercials? I’m not a sales person.
A: There are many options here. If you already have a decent-sized national audience, there are sales reps who will happily sell your commercials for a commission. If your show is still in the growth stage, there are several ways to make money from your airtime.

Q: What’s Syndication.net?
A: The web site is a free resource from Syndication Networks Corp. Our company was founded in 1993 in New York and Chicago and specializes in media syndication and consulting. Today the company is based in suburban Chicago.

Contact Us for details on our syndication consulting and marketing services.

Go to Grow Your Show or About Us.

 

 

 
Syndication Networks